projects

The 1949 Jacket pattern – order today and save!

Introducing the 1949 Jacket Pattern by Pendleton!

Pre-order your pattern and save, regular cost: $20.00, pre-order at $15.00.

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This is based on our famous ’49er jacket, star of our women’s line debut in 1949. Read about it here: The Pendleton ’49er jacket

The joy of sewing your own jacket is that you can make all the changes you’d like to.

  • Choose a plaid, a stripe or a solid wool – even a jacquard pattern!
  • Add or omit pockets.
  • Add a self-belt.
  • Lengthen or shorten the body and sleeves.
  • Use any buttons you’d like – maybe some special vintage buttons you’ve been saving for a project!
  • Sew it up in cotton for summer wear.

The list is endless! So call and order yours today. We are so excited about this one!

Sizing information:

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Patterns will be mailed to you in April. Call to order: 503-535-5786

Also, thanks to popular demand, this pattern is in development for Plus sizes!

projects

Letterman’s Jacket with Pendleton Fabric!

We have a long history of providing wool to the makers of lettermen’s jackets, but this is the first one we’ve seen that uses our incredible jacquard-woven patterned wool.

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Alysia designed this jacket for her son, Phillip, who lettered in football (4 years) and basketball (1 year) at White Swan High School in Washington state. Phillip’s family is so proud of his accomplishments, and this jacket was a great way to show it.

Alysia patterned and cut the jacket in our Rio Rancho fabric and full grain leather. She had it sewn by a professional shop that has the proper machinery to sew with leather.

Thanks to Alysia for sharing this great jacket, and congratulations to Phillip. Here’s to his bright future!

projects

Customer Project – Sierra Trapeze Coat in Rio Rancho

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We were treated to these beautiful photos of her latest project by Andrea Hungerford, a local designer. We are delighted to share them with you.

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Here is Andrea’s note:

Hi – as a local Oregon sewing and knitwear designer, I wanted to share my latest sewing pattern, the Sierra Trapeze Coat – made from fabrics I purchased at the Pendleton Woolen Mill Store!  You can find this pattern in Lookbook No. 8 of By Hand Serial, a series of books all about fiber and fabric makers.  

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The fabric is Rio Rancho in Black.

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Learn more here: Wool Fabrics

By Hand Serial is a tri-annual travelogue written by makers, for makers. Written and produced by Andrea Hungerford, this book series focuses on local crafting communities that are helping incubate, encourage, and support folk who are exploring a wide variety of craft related businesses and artistic pursuits.

Says Andrea, “Our readership, while still growing, is enthusiastic about every issue. Unlike other modern craft publications, our focus is not just on what is being made, but on the hands that are actively creating it.”

Andrea found during her own travels for family and work that often where one maker flourished, many were also succeeding in their region, and wanted to provide an opportunity to highlight these exciting areas and introduce them to others who might not be able to discover them in person.

By Hand Serial is in its third year and each issue is full of personal interviews, thoughtfully written profiles, enticing photography and a variety of projects for knitting, sewing, baking, and more. See more here: By Hand Serial 

And come see us for patterns, fabrics, and ideas.

projects

Make It With Wool Winner & Pendleton Tartan on the cover of Threads magazine!

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Kelsey Clear of Niles, Michigan, who learned to sew when she was only six years old, recently won First Runner Up honors in the Make It With Wool contest–and she did it with Pendleton wool. But not just any Pendleton wool! Kelsey sewed her winning look with our very own tartan, as registered with the Scottish Tartans Society.

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Pendleton Woolen Mills registered the official Pendleton Hunting Tartan with the Scottish Tartans Society in 1999. It was created to commemorate Pendleton’s roots in the Pacific Northwest and the many generations of family that have overseen Pendleton’s business through the years. The official company tartan also salutes the British Isles origin of Pendleton’s weaving heritage, thanks to our founder, Thomas Kay.

And yes, that’s the very tartan bordering the certificate. For a closer look at the winning look, which includes more than just that adorable shirtwaist dress, pick up a copy of Threads today–we have it in stock at the store. Perhaps you’ll be inspired to sew your own project with Pendleton Hunting Tartan. We would love to see it!

projects

Update: Collaborative Crochet with Artist Bonnie Meltzer

Through November, this beautiful piece is now hanging at Art at the Cave Gallery, 108 E. Evergreen, Vancouver, Washington. This finished sculpture was created in just one day at Arts of Clark County’s Collaborative Crochet “Make Art!” workshop on August 7, 2018.

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The piece, called “Together,” was made and designed as the day progressed by the participants.  It will be available for purchase through a silent auction during the Clark County Open Studios Exhibition at Art at the Cave. Proceeds from the sale will help fund next years “Make Art!” workshops, including Bonnie Melzer’s “THE COMMON THREAD:  a collaborative crochet workshop.” We are proud to be part of this endeavor, and look forward to seeing what beautiful art can be made from our selvage.

This video gives you a fun look at the process–and the sheer size!–of this project.

 

Title: “Together”

Artists: Collaborative work led by Bonnie Meltzer with Sandra Parisi, James Donegan, Allison Berkley  Jackie Admundson, Karen Bettin, Michelle Craig, Annie Davern, Lida Dekker, Sandra Easterly, Debbie Garbe, Ellen George, Kitty Hibbs, Pat LaCroix, Antonella Mancini, Mindy Morris, Kim Murton, Kelly Neidig, Debra Pellti, Sue Phelps, Dana Phillips, Alaia Smith, Diane Springer, Molly Weinstein, Karen Zopf and eight others. Preparation and mounting by K.C. Madsen.

Medium: Pendleton Woolen Mills selvage, yarn, wire, panel, ready to hang

Dimensions: 56″ x 48″ x 10″

Created in Arts of Clark County’s Collaborative Crochet “Make Art!” workshop at The Historic Trust’s event, CommonGround: The Vancouver Chautauqua, August 7, 2018.

 

projects

Crochet Rug Project

rug classHere are directions for the crochet rug we taught at the Sewing Expo.

Materials
Five pounds of selvages makes one 2’x3’ rug
Size S crochet hook
Scissors
Yarn needle

Gauge
Loose. Very loose. If you work tighter the rug will be firmer, however it can become very difficult to work through the stitches if you are too tight.

Getting Started
Find the end of the selvage, or cut a section to make a starting point. Wind the selvage into balls, splicing the ends together if you come to an end. If it gets too tangled, you can cut it and splice the ends together.

Splicing
Pull the weft yarns out of the warps for the 2 inches at the end of each selvage strand. Place all 4 ends together and tie an overhand knot. Trim ends even with selvage fringe.

Technique: Single Crochet
Start:
Chain 10-24 Stitches. The number of stitches in your chain will determine the shape of your rug. Starting with just a few will give you a rounder shape; more will create a longer oval.
Row 1:
Single crochet in second chain from hook and each chain across to last chain.
Do not turn the work, instead chain 1* and work the other side of your beginning chain.
This is the first round or row.
*Adjustments: If you are using thick selvage, or think you need a little more room on the end, chain 2-3 stitches off the end of row 1.

Shaping:
Continue: Repeat around chain, increasing at ends of rug until reaching desired size.
Note: Sometimes you will need to adjust your increases to shape your rug.
If rug begins to ruffle you are increasing too much.
If rug begins to bowl you are not increasing enough.

Ending:
Taper the wool by dropping one of the two selvage strands, and crochet two more stitches. Cut the selvage and pull through. Use a yarn needle to weave in the ends.

Care:
Dry clean or hand wash. For hand washing, soak in mild soap and tepid water in tub. Drain tub, refill with cool water to rinse soap. When soap is rinsed out, run through the spin cycle of washing machine to remove most of water then lay flat to dry in ventilated area.